Invasive Plants and Agricultural Pest Management

Weed Free Gravel

 

Weed free gravel
an infestation of Spotted knapweed on the Dalton Highway
White sweetclover infestation in a gravel pit on the Dalton Hwy

 

Since 2009, the Division of Agriculture has been coordinating efforts to research and prevent the spread of invasive plants via gravel in Alaska through the development of a weed free gravel certification program. This voluntary program aims at providing a weed free gravel product to land managers working in sensitive areas while also offering producers a way to certify materials for a value-added product.

 

The Weed Free Gravel Certification Program, structured much like the existing Weed Free Forage Certification Program, involves a coordinated inspection by trained personnel to document the material site does not contain any propagative parts of noxious or undesirable (listed) plants. A material site must be inspected twice per growing season to fully meet the standards with an exemption made for remote material sites that meet certain criteria.

In May 2012, the Weed Free Gravel Program officially got underway with the first inspector training. The inspectors met alongside the Weed Free Forage Inspectors at a training hosted by the Division of Agriculture and the Cooperative Extension Service. Inspector trainings will be held each spring and will be offered to new and recertifying inspectors. Though an inspector certification is valid for 5 years, we encourage attendance each year to keep up with program changes and to refresh your plant identification skills.

If you are interested in participating in the Weed Free Gravel Program, either as a producer or a buyer, please contact the Division of Agriculture or your local Soil and Water Conservation District.

Weed Free inspector training at the Alaska Plant Materials Center

Weed Free Gravel - Resources:

 

 


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